The Etymologicon

Discover the answers to all of these etymological questions and more in this fascinating book for fans of of Eats, Shoots & Leaves. The Etymologicon is a completely unauthorized guide to the strange underpinnings of the English language.

The Etymologicon

The Etymologicon

This perfect gift for readers, writers, and literature majors alike unearths the quirks of the English language. For example, do you know why a mortgage is literally a “death pledge”? Why guns have girls’ names? Why “salt” is related to “soldier”? Discover the answers to all of these etymological questions and more in this fascinating book for fans of of Eats, Shoots & Leaves. The Etymologicon is a completely unauthorized guide to the strange underpinnings of the English language. It explains how you get from “gruntled” to “disgruntled”; why you are absolutely right to believe that your meager salary barely covers “money for salt”; how the biggest chain of coffee shops in the world connects to whaling in Nantucket; and what, precisely, the Rolling Stones have to do with gardening. This witty book will awake the linguist in you and illuminate the hidden meanings behind common words and phrases, tracing their evolution through all of their surprising paths throughout history.

More Books:

The Etymologicon
Language: en
Pages: 304
Authors: Mark Forsyth
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-10-02 - Publisher: Penguin

This perfect gift for readers, writers, and literature majors alike unearths the quirks of the English language. For example, do you know why a mortgage is literally a “death pledge”? Why guns have girls’ names? Why “salt” is related to “soldier”? Discover the answers to all of these etymological questions
Mark Forysth's Gemel Edition
Language: en
Pages: 544
Authors: Mark Forsyth
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-11-01 - Publisher: Icon Books Ltd

The Etymologicon springs from Mark Forsyth’s Inky Fool blog about the strange connections between words. The Horologicon – which means ‘a book of things appropriate to each hour’ - follows a day in the life of unusual, beautiful and forgotten English words.
The First Century of English Monolingual Lexicography
Language: en
Pages: 180
Authors: Kusujiro Miyoshi
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-05-11 - Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

This book deals with monolingual English dictionaries from 1604 to 1702. The major scholarly reference works which individually treat early English dictionaries are De Witt Starnes and Gertrude Noyes’s English Dictionary from Cawdrey to Johnson: 1604–1755 (1946) and The Oxford History of English Lexicography (2009) edited by A. P. Cowie.
The Illustrated Etymologicon
Language: en
Pages: 320
Authors: Mark Forsyth
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-11-04 - Publisher: Icon Books

A NEW, BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED HARDBACK EDITION OF THE SUNDAY TIMES NUMBER ONE BESTSELLER, PUBLISHED ON ITS TENTH ANNIVERSARY. 'Witty and erudite ... stuffed with the kind of arcane information that nobody strictly needs to know, but which is a pleasure to learn nonetheless.' Nick Duerden, Independent. 'Particularly good ... Forsyth
The Etymologicon and the Horologicon
Language: en
Pages: 544
Authors: Mark Forsyth
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-11-07 - Publisher:

What is the actual connection between disgruntled and gruntled? What links church organs to organised crime, California to the Caliphate, or brackets to codpieces?The Etymologicon springs from Mark Forsyth's Inky Fool blog on the strange connections between words. It's an occasionally ribald, frequently witty and unerringly erudite guided tour of